huntington station bank west

Historic Timeline of Huntington Station Comprehensive Planning
1867-2003

Researched by Keith Brown, community activist and local attorney

“Time is too precious a thing to waste”

1867
.The Long Island Railroad extends east on Long Island from Syosset to Huntington Station
1890
Post Office established and named “Fairground, New York” July 24, 1890
1909
1909-11 Long Island Railroad builds overpass and New York Avenue becomes an underpass and new depot built on east side of New York Avenue
1912
Fairground changed to Huntington Station August 12, 1912
1927
The State Legislature authorizes Towns to prepare and adopt Official Maps
1934

(#1 PLAN) Schermerhorn Group completes the first study of Huntington Township: Huntington adopts first Zoning Code (the “Code”) called the.
SCHERMERHORN PLAN 1933 .

1947
1947-48 Zoning Map revised to make zoning more restrictive; purposely leaving high-density categories (D&E) for moderate-income housing.
1956
Town removes multiple unit high-density uses from the Code in all but business zoning districts and simultaneously adopts a new procedure to convert single-family dwellings to two-family uses.
1957
Town Begins its First Urban Renewal Project in Huntington Village In order to construct a new post office and to provide additional parking in Village, the Town condemns and razes many homes.
1959 Town Board forms the Citizens Housing Advisory Committee
1962
(#2 PLAN)Bartholemew Associates, hired by the Town as consultants, begin to publish a series of reports in connection with the Town’s FIRST COMPREHENSIVE MASTER PLAN.The report on Population Distribution and Density calls for the rehabilitation of Huntington Village and Huntington Station and declares that 3,000 units of multiple-residence housing should be constructed by 1980. The plan favored these areas because of the availability of a public sewage system. The Citizen Housing Advisory Committee is appointed to review and respond to the Bartholemew Reports.
1962
*** Town begins the Urban Renewal Project in Huntington Station under the Flynn administration by condemning all businesses and residences along New York Avenue and Broadway. The project is called
GENERAL NEIGHBORHOOD RENEWAL PLAN better known as (LIFT) LOCAL IMPROVEMENT FOR TOMORROW
IN 1967 The Comprehensive Plan is adopted.
1962

Property Owners receive notification of property taken by Eminent Domain

Urban "Removal" begins in Huntington Station in 1967

 

1967

The Town Housing Authority develops a 49-unit public housing complex called Gateway Gardens. The Town sells the LIFT project property on the east side of New York Avenue to Melville Industrial Associates who propose to construct luxury apartments on the site.

MELVILLE INDUSTRIAL ASSOCIATES SUBSEQUENTLY FILES FOR BANKRUPTCY
AND THE PROJECT IS NEVER CONSTRUCTED.

1969
The Town revises its Zoning Ordinance to comply with some of the recommendations made in the Comprehensive Plan. One amendment of the Code restricts construction of multiple-family dwellings to projects owned, maintained or operated by the Housing Authority and to the Urban Renewal area.
1969
1969-1974 The Town’s Urban Renewal Office, under the Ambro Administration, revises its planned 120 subsidized housing complex in Huntington Station to 260 units. The project is called Whitman Village
1970

The Huntington Democratic Committee publishes a report on housing which calls for the development of multi-family dwellings in the Town.

The Town creates a Senior Citizen Housing Committee to study senior citizen housing needs in the Town.

1972

The town contracts the Suffolk Community Development Corporation to conduct a study of the Town’s housing needs. The study called for the construction of 182 new housing units.The Town amends the Zoning Code to create a special zoning district (R-RM) to construct a subsidized-rental senior citizen housing complex.

PAUMANACK VILLAGE IS COMPLETED IN 1980

1974
Congress passes the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 wherein the town can receive block grants for infrastructure, housing development, rehabilitation and rental assistance.
In connection with the Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG), the Town under the Ambro Administration hires a consulting firm, Gordian Associates, to Update the Comprehensive Plan. An update to THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PREPARED BY GORDIAN IS NEVER MADE PUBLIC.
1975
THE MOORE PLAN 1975 - another development that never took place. Page 250 of Portrait of a Small Town III
1977
Pursuant to the CDBG regulations, the Town prepares a Housing Assistance Plan which calls for the construction of 108 subsidized housing units over the next three years.
1978
Congress passes the Community Development Act of 1978 which creates, among other things, a new United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Section 8 New Construction Program.
1981
Housing Help Inc. and the Huntington branch of the NAACP initiate a lawsuit against the Town and HUD alleging, among other things, that the Town’s Zoning Ordinance is exclusionary zoning, violates the Fair Housing Act and is discriminatory because it prohibits multi-family residential housing outside of the Urban Renewal Area in Huntington Station.
1981
June 23- As a result of the Housing Help Inc./NAACP litigation, the Town Board passes a resolution withdrawing their proposal for the 150 unit Huntington Station project
1987
The Town purchases the 8.9 acre parcel on the east side of New York Avenue from the County of Suffolk. The property falls into the hands of the County through a tax default as a result of Melville Industrial Associates filing for bankruptcy and becoming insolvent in 1967.
The Town Board creates the Citizens Advisory Committee to assist the planning of the parcel located on the east side of New York Avenue and the northside of Broadway, part of the former Urban Renewal area. The Citizens Advisory Committee chaired by Ken Christensen, selects the firm of Conklin Rossant to perform the planning, urban design and design layout.
1988
The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit issues a decision in the case of Huntington Branch NAACP vs. Town of Huntington 844 F.2d926 (2nd Cir.),aff’d, 488 U.S. 15 (1988) ordering the Town, among other things, to remove the Zoning Code’s restrictions against multi-family housing. The decision is later upheld by the United States Supreme Court.
1989
(#3)Plan HUNTINGTON STATION REVITALIZATION PLAN 1989
prepared by the consultant firm Conklin Rossant is published.
1993
The updated Comprehensive Plan published is adopted by the Planning Board. However, the update is
NEVER ADOPTED BY THE TOWN BOARD.
1996-1999
1996-1999 HUD repeatedly criticizes the Town’s actions with respect to its fair housing practices as inadequate and authorized sanctions and/or corrective actions.
1999
In a letter, HUD notifies the Town that it has referred a fair housing complaint to the Department of Justice.
1999
HIGHVIEW AT HUNTINGTON project begins
The Highview Project is developed some 30 years after the property, formerly the central business district of Huntington Station, was condemned.
The Town Board creates the Huntington Station Revitalization Committee to study possible redevelopment of the area.
   
2000
4 people tragically killed in a fire in a home located at 28 West Hills Road, Huntington Station.
2001

Oct. 2001(#4 PLAN) The Town Board hires the consulting firm Fox Fowle to prepare a new Revitalization Plan for Huntington Station, the fourth of such plans. Fox Fowle conducts a community outreach program at the Intermediary School on Lowndes Avenue. For various reasons, the outreach is sparsely attended.

Highview opens-- A Huntington Station community of 100 mixed-income co-op units.  Residents chosen based on lottery held

2002
Mar. 2002 The Town Board unveils the Revitalization Plan prepared by Fox Fowle. Huntington Station residents in attendance are in shock over the amount of housing contemplated in the Plan. The Town Board later removes the housing component from the Plan.
2002

April 2002 A joint Meeting of the Town Board/District 3 School Board is held. Over 1500 area residents attend to decry the Housing Component of the Huntington Station Revitalization Committee’s Plan. During the meeting the Town Board and the Director of Code Enforcement is publicly chastised for their lack of Code Enforcement in the Huntington Station area.
July 2002- Nov. 2003
The Town Board, as direct result of the April 22, 2002 meeting, announces Operation Huntington Against Illegal Landlords (HAIL) Storm, which is a series of 3 Zoning Code amendments designed to reduce the level of illegal housing in Huntington Station by creating an internal Zoning Violations Bureau. The Bureau targets repeat offenders, requires rental registrations, and permits the Town to issue administrative search warrants to determine if a rental property is noncompliant with the Town Code.
2002
Sept. 2002 A parking variance application was brought to the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) in connection with building a 24 hour Laundromat on the southeast corner of New York Avenue and Olive Street. The application was postponed by the ZBA until November 21, 2002.
Nov. 19, 2002 The Town Board at the urging of the Huntington Station Revitalization Committee adopts a 6 month moratorium prohibiting any commercial or industrial development within the core of the Revitalization Area. The Town Board adopts a resolution to release requests for proposals from 7 previously qualified planning firms to update the Master Plan
2003
Jan. 2003 Vision Long Island is hired as a consultant to conduct an economic analysis, community outreach, and a new Revitalization Plan for Huntington Station.
2003
Jan. 13, 2003 Joint Meeting of the Huntington and South Huntington School Boards is held to establish a committee to review the Town’s policies towards Huntington Station and draft a Joint Statement to the Town Board regarding their findings
2003
Economic Development Corporation (EDC) formed.  The Town of Huntington Economic Development Corporation is a not-for-profit corporation that was formed by the Huntington Town Board to create supportable economic development projects in the Huntington Station Transportation Hub as part of ongoing revitalization.
 
Huntington Station Business Improvement District (HS BID) formed.
2006
Phase 1 New York Avenue Streetscaping project completed (phase I included New York Avenue west side, from Academy Place to Railroad Street).  It began in October 2006 and was completed in December 2006.  Brick sidewalks, street lampposts, trees, new curbs and landscaping extended to the Huntington Train Station Hub area.
2007
Northridge Retail/Cultural Center proposed.
2008
The Town of Huntington released the Comprehensive Plan Update Horizons 2020- a draft version of what will become a roadmap for future development in the Town that includes Huntington Station, East Northport and Dix Hills.
2010
JULY 19th...The Huntington School Board voted to close Jack Abrams Intermediate School located on Lowndes Avenue in Huntington Station, after an emergency meeting. The 4-3 vote means that 360 schoolchildren in grades 4, 5, and 6 will be moved to other schools, when classes begin in September. The emergency board session was held, after a series of violent incidents in a nine day period in the surrounding community of Huntington Station.





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