The Huntington Station Community, from its founding in 1867 to its physical destruction
through the Urban Renewal programin the 1960's,to its ongoing Revitalization efforts
.

PORTRAIT OF A SMALL TOWN I


A Pictorial and Personal History

of

Huntington Station

BOOK1
 


Portrait of aSmall Town I - Huntington Station is a nostalgic view of a small hamlet in the Town of Huntington. Historically, the hamlet of Huntington Station was always considered the "other side of the tracks." It has been inadequately documented in the past and almost forgotten until now.

Few people alive today know that this vibrant community even existed. Those who do remember are still trying to make some sense out of its destruction. It was not a war that destroyed this Huntington Station community. It was a failed government program called Urban Renewal interfering in our local neighborhoods.

For decades, Urban Renewal projects became the greatest threat to America’s historic landmarks and districts. Based on the theory that the worn buildings could no longer contribute to the economic revival of Huntington Station, demolition began in the early 1960's. The destruction phase was very successful. The renewal phase, however, was never accomplished. When interviewed, one long-time resident smiled, shook his head and said, “They should not have called it Urban Renewal, they should have called it Urban Removal.”

The destruction of this community not only had an emotional effect on the people who lived here, but also will affect future generations and newcomers to Huntington Station. The people who lived here have had part of their identity removed. Future generation and newcomers will have no community to identify with.

Portrait Of A Small Town I began as a pictorial history with photographs from personal collections and the Huntington Historical Society, and was further enhanced by a series of first-person narratives about small town life in Huntington Station from the 1920s through the 1960s. This book evokes a simpler time, and shared values. Families believed in education, a strong moral tradition, hard work, and that tomorrow will always be a better day.
The response to Portrait I was overwhelming. The letters and photographs I received from readers of Portrait I, has given me a greater insight into the mystique surrounding the hamlet of Huntington Station. Portrait I touched a soft spot in the hearts of the people that lived in Huntington Station. They all have positive feelings about the rise and fall of this small community. From the first to last of all the responses, the memories of Huntington Station and its community spirit were the common factors and the most enduring. The physical structures may be gone, but fortunately the memories will live on forever.

It was these responses that convinced me to NOT to republish this first book of the trilogy and to write a new book and to include a critical review of this vanished community. This is the narrative that must be told .

 

PORTRAIT OF A SMALL TOWN III
Huntington Station
'A New Perspective
'


A Critical Review Of A Vanished Community
A Narrative That Must Be Told.

  book 3-s  
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The renewal phase, however, was never accomplished. When interviewed, one
long-time resident smiled, shook his head and said, “They should not have called
it Urban Renewal, they should have called it Urban Removal.” The destruction
of this community not only had an emotional effect on the people who lived here,
but also will affect future generations and newcomers to Huntington Station. The
people who lived here have had part of their identity removed. Future generation
and newcomers will have no community to identify with.
Portrait Of A Small Town I began as a pictorial history with photographs
from personal collections and the Huntington Historical Society, and was further
enhanced by a series of first-person narratives about small town life in Huntington Station from the 1920s
through the 1960s. This book evokes a simpler time, and shared values. Families believed in education, a strong
moral tradition, hard work, and that tomorrow will always be a better day.
The response to Portrait I was overwhelming. The letters and photographs I received from readers of
Portrait I, has given me a greater insight into the mystique surrounding the hamlet of Huntington Station.
Portrait I touched a soft spot in the hearts of the people that lived in Huntington Station. They all have positive
feelings about the rise and fall of this small community. From the first to last of all the responses, the memories
of Huntington Station and its community spirit were the common factors and the most enduring. The physical
structures may be gone, but fortunately the memories will live on forever.
It was these responses that convinced me to NOT to republish this first book of the trilogy and to write
a new book and to include a critical review of this vanished community.
This is a narrative that must be told . . .
PORTRAIT OF A SMALL TOWN III
Huntington Station
'A New Perspective'
A Critical Review Of A Vanished Community

Portrait of a Small Town I - Huntington Station is a nostalgic view of a small hamlet in the Town of Huntington.
Historically, the hamlet of Huntington Station was always considered the "other side of the tracks." It has been
inadequately documented in the past and almost forgotten until now.
Few people alive today know that this vibrant community even existed. Those who do
remember are still trying to make some sense out of its destruction. It was not a war that destroyed this
Huntington Station community. It was a failed government program called Urban Renewal interfering in our local
neighborhoods.
For decades, Urban Renewal projects became the greatest threat to
America’s historic landmarks and districts. Based on the theory that the worn
buildings could no longer contribute to the economic revival of Huntington Station,
demolition began in the early 1960's. The destruction phase was very successful.
The renewal phase, however, was never accomplished. When interviewed, one
long-time resident smiled, shook his head and said, “They should not have called
it Urban Renewal, they should have called it Urban Removal.” The destruction
of this community not only had an emotional effect on the people who lived here,
but also will affect future generations and newcomers to Huntington Station. The
people who lived here have had part of their identity removed. Future generation
and newcomers will have no community to identify with.
Portrait Of A Small Town I began as a pictorial history with photographs
from personal collections and the Huntington Historical Society, and was further
enhanced by a series of first-person narratives about small town life in Huntington Station from the 1920s
through the 1960s. This book evokes a simpler time, and shared values. Families believed in education, a strong
moral tradition, hard work, and that tomorrow will always be a better day.
The response to Portrait I was overwhelming. The letters and photographs I received from readers of
Portrait I, has given me a greater insight into the mystique surrounding the hamlet of Huntington Station.
d